Citations Will Continue To Haunt A License, by Sharice B. Marootian, Abdulaziz, Grossbart & Rudman

Kelly Ceballos CSLB News, Legal Updates for PHCC Members, Legislative, News from PHCC National, PHCC Members In The News, Plumbing in the News, Press Releases 2 Comments

The Contractors’ State License Board (“CSLB”) licenses and regulates contractors in California.  The Contractors’ License Law sets forth the parameters by which it does so.  On August 19, 2016, the Governor signed into law Senate Bill 1209, authored by Senator Morrell and sponsored by the CSLB.  SB 1209 provides that citations issued against a licensed contractor will follow the contractor if he or she is issued another license.  It authorizes the disclosure of these citations within existing disclosure time frames.  The law takes effect on January 1, 2017.

The current law requires an applicant for licensure to qualify in regard to his or her experience depending on whether the applicant is an individual or a business entity.  All licenses must have a qualifying individual listed on the CSLB records.  The same person may serve as the qualifier for more than one classification.  It requires the Registrar to make available to the public the date, nature, and disposition of all legal actions against a licensee, except as specified, and limits the disclosure of citations to a specified time period.  Current law limits disclosure of a citation only to the license subject to a complaint substantiating that citation.  Once disclosed, it does not extend that disclosure to licenses obtained or joined by persons thereafter.

The new law will now require that disclosure of citations also appear on the license record of any other license identified as a qualifier who is listed in the members of the personnel of record of the license that was issued the citation.  “Members of the personnel of record” is defined as every person listed in the records of the Registrar as then associated with a licensee.  The disclosure shall be for the period of disclosure of the citation.  In other words, the disclosures will follow the person to whom the citation was noticed so that they also appear on the license record of any other license he or she files.

The purpose of the new law is to enhance the disclosure to the public regarding contractors who have been disciplined by the CSLB.  According to the author,

“[This bill] is a common sense consumer protection bill that closes a loophole in current law.  Presently, the [CSLB] requires contractors to publicly disclose any citation they have received within the past five years.  However, if a contractor obtains a new license, the citation does not follow them, allowing bad actors to hide from consumers any citations they may have received. This bill closes that loophole, providing for greater consumer confidence.”

The CSLB licenses over 300,000 contractors, in 44 classifications and two certifications.  Supporters of the bill, and now the newly enacted law, proclaim that it furthers the public protection goal of the existing law.

Abdulaziz, Grossbart & Rudman provides this information as a service to its friends and clients. This Newsletter is of a general nature and is not intended to be a substitute for legal advice. This Newsletter does not establish an attorney-client relationship with the reader.  Since laws are ever changing, please contact an attorney before using any of the information contained within this Newsletter.

Abdulaziz, Grossbart & Rudman

P.O. Box 15458, North Hollywood, California 91606

(818) 760-2000; (818) 760-3908 (fax)

info@agrlaw.com   www.agrlaw.com

Comments 2

  1. Why don’t they focus on rounding up all the painters with 20 employees and exempt worker comp insurance or the rich liberal city’s like Malibu where I have given out 300 bids and have not had one excepted because of illegal immigrants and cheating contractors?

    1. Post
      Author

      Thank you for your passionate response to the article. It is concerning that some contractors are merely impostors and have no right running jobs without the proper licensing. While it’s impossible for us to ascertain that illegal immigrants and cheating contractors are the reasons your bids aren’t being accepted, we can suggest that you report unlicensed contractors on those jobs. You can report unlicensed contractors right here. It also sounds like you’re asking for more representation for legitimate businesses. Remember that as a member of PHCC you have access to advocacy and legislative representation. You have the opportunity to be heard by the people who make and enforce the laws. If you are not a member, find your local chapter and apply here https://caphcc.org/phcc-training/phcc-local-chapters/.
      Please note:
      I removed the profanity from your original submission as not to offend our readers.

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